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David Hume

David Hume's History of England, Edited for the Modern Reader: Volume 5, 1603-1649

David Hume's History of England, Edited for the Modern Reader: Volume 5, 1603-1649( )
Author: Hume, David
Editor: Berry, William
Publication Date:Jul 2013
Publisher:CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
Book Format:Paperback
List Price:USD $14.95
Book Description:

A century before the American Revolution, the first great clash between ancient monarchy and modern ideas of liberty took place on the battlefields of England. This epic story of England in the first half of the seventeenth century, a half century of unrest that culminated in the English Civil War, begins with the accession of the first Stuart king, James I, to the throne of England, continues with the infamous "gunpowder treason" of Guy Fawkes, and proceeds through every crucial event...
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Book Details
Physical Dimensions (W X L X H):6 x 9 x 1.07 Inches
Book Weight:1.75 Pounds
Author Biography
Hume, David (Author)
David Hume was born in Edinburgh to a minor Scottish noble family, raised at the estate of Ninewells, and attended the University of Edinburgh for two years until he was 15. Although his family wished him to study law, he found himself unsuited to this. He studied at home, tried business briefly, and after receiving a small inheritance traveled to France, settling at La Fleche, where Descartes had gone to school. There he completed his first and major philosophical work, A Treatise of Human Nature (1739--40), published in three volumes. Hume claimed on the title page that he was introducing the experimental method of reasoning into moral subjects, and further that he was offering a new way of seeing the limits of human knowledge. Although his work was largely ignored, Hume gained from it a reputation as a philosophical skeptic and an opponent of traditional religion. (In later years he was called "the great infidel.") This reputation led to his being rejected for professorships at both Edinburgh and Glasgow.

To earn his living he served variously as the secretary to General St. Clair, as the attendant to the mad Marquis of Annandale, and as the keeper of the Advocates Library in Edinburgh. While holding these positions, he wrote and published a new version of his philosophy, the two Enquiries, and many essays on social, political, moral, and literary subjects. He also began his six-volume History of England from the Roman Invasion to the Glorious Revolution (1754--62), the work that made him most famous in his lifetime.

Hume retired from public life and settled in Edinburgh, where he was the leading figure in Scottish letters and a good friend to many of the leading intellectuals of the time, including Adam Smith and Benjamin Franklin. During this period, he completed the Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, which he had been working on for more than 25 years. Hume first worked on the Dialogues in the middle of his career, but put them aside as too

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