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The Moorland Cotttage - a book by Gaskell, Elizabeth Cleghorn

The Moorland Cotttage

The Moorland Cotttage( )
Author: Gaskell, Elizabeth Cleghorn
Publication Date:Jul 2013
Publisher:CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
Book Format:Paperback
List Price:USD $5.30
Book Description:

A young girl called Maggie, loves her overbearing brother, despite his occasional bullying. But will she give up the man she loves at her brother's insistence? Yes, the plot does have similarities with George Eliot's 'The Mill on the Floss' and the heroines share the same name. Both have a similar climactic scene. Eliot's novel dates from 1860, so Gaskell's book came first. Despite the plot similarities, the treatment of the theme is rather different.

Book Details
Physical Dimensions (W X L X H):6 x 9 x 0.26 Inches
Book Weight:0.47 Pounds
Author Biography
Gaskell, Elizabeth Cleghorn (Author)
Elizabeth Gaskell was born on September 29, 1810 to a Unitarian clergyman, who was also a civil servant and journalist. Her mother died when she was young, and she was brought up by her aunt in Knutsford, a small village that was the prototype for Cranford, Hollingford and the setting for numerous other short stories. In 1832, she married William Gaskell, a Unitarian clergyman in Manchester. She participated in his ministry and collaborated with him to write the poem Sketches among the Poor in 1837.

Our Society at Cranford was the first two chapters of Cranford and it appeared in Dickens' Household Words in 1851. Dickens liked it so much that he pressed Gaskell for more episodes, and she produced eight more of them between 1852 and 1853. She also wrote My Lady Ludlow and Lois the Witch, a novella that concerns the Salem witch trials. Wives and Daughters ran in Cornhill from August 1864 to January 1866. The final installment was never written but the ending was known and the novel exists now virtually complete. The story centers on a series of relationships between family groups in Hollingford. Most critics agree that her greatest achievement is the short novel Cousin Phillis.

Gaskell was also followed by controversy. In 1853, she offended many readers with Ruth, which explored seduction and illegitimacy that led the "fallen woman" into ostracism and inevitable prostitution. The novel presents the social conduct in a small community when tolerance and morality clash. Critics praised the novel's moral lessons but Gaskell's own congregation burned the book and it was banned in many libraries. In 1857, The Life of Charlotte Brontë was published. The biography was initially praised but angry protests came from some of the people it dealt with.

Gaskell was against any biographical notice of her being written during her lifetime. After her death on November 12, 1865, her family refused to make family letters or biographical data av

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