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Faulkner and Psychology

Faulkner and Psychology( )
Author: Faulkner, William
Editor: Abadie, Ann J.
Kartiganer, Donald M.
Series title:Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Ser.
ISBN:978-0-87805-742-9
Publication Date:Oct 1994
Publisher:University Press of Mississippi
Book Format:Hardback
List Price:USD $50.00
Book Description:

Works by the Nobel Prize author as seen in psychological perspectives. Papers from the Faulkner Conference held in 1991 at the University of Mississippi

Book Details
Pages:344
Detailed Subjects: Literary Criticism / American / General
Literary Criticism / Subjects & Themes / General
Physical Dimensions (W X L X H):6.32 x 9.33 x 1.32 Inches
Book Weight:1.69 Pounds
Author Biography
Faulkner, William (Author)
Born in an old Mississippi family, William Faulkner made his home in Oxford, seat of the University of Mississippi. After the fifth grade he went to school only off and on-lived, read, and wrote much as he pleased. In 1918, refusing to enlist with the "Yankees," he joined the Canadian Air Force, and was transferred to the British Royal Air Force. After the war he studied a little at the University, did house painting, worked as a night superintendent at a power plant, went to New Orleans and became a friend of Sherwood Anderson, then to Europe and back home to Oxford. By this time he had written two novels.

The Sound and the Fury followed in 1929. Financial success came with Sanctuary in 1931, which he assisted in filming. Faulkner 's novels are intense in their character portrayals of disintegrating Southern aristocrats, poor whites, and African Americans. A complex stream-of-consciousness rhetoric often involves Faulkner in lengthy sentences of anguished power. Most of his tales are set in the mythical Yoknapatawpha County, Mississippi, and are characterized by the use of many recurring characters from families of different social levels spanning more than a century. His best subjects are the old, dying South and the newer materialistic South.

As I Lay Dying (1930), is a grotesquely tragicomic story about a family of poor southern whites. With Absalom, Absalom! (1936); the difficult parts of his famous short novel "The Bear" (published in Go Down, Moses, 1942); and the allegorical A Fable (1954), a non-Yoknapatawpha novel set in France during World War I; Faulkner returned to an innovative and difficult style that most readers have trouble with. Yet, interspersed among such works are collections of easily read stories originally published in popular magazines. There seems to be a growing sentiment among critics that the Snopes trilogy-The Hamlet (1940), The Town (1957), and The Mansion (1959)-for the most part an example of Faulkner's "moderate" style,



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