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Selected Letters of William Makepeace Thackeray

Selected Letters of William Makepeace Thackeray( )
Author: Thackeray, William Makepeace
Editor: Harden, Edgar F.
Hill, Mike
ISBN:978-0-8147-3546-6
Publication Date:Dec 1996
Publisher:New York University Press
Imprint:NYU Press
Book Format:Hardback
List Price:USD $89.00
Book Description:

In Selected Letters of William Makepeace Thackeray, Edgar F. Harden provides a lively and accessible framework for selected letters, diaries, and comical illustrations of Thackeray. Harden has carefully selected documents which convey the essential biographical developments of a very interesting life and pictorial expressions of a great man of letters. He traces Thackeray's growth and development as a writer, from his school days in Southhampton to Cambridge University, which he...
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Book Details
Pages:400
Detailed Subjects: Literary Criticism / European / English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh
Literary Collections / Letters
Physical Dimensions (W X L X H):6 x 9 Inches
Author Biography
Thackeray, William Makepeace (Author)
William Makepeace Thackeray was born in Calcutta, India, where his father was in service to the East India Company. After the death of his father in 1816, he was sent to England to attend school. Upon reaching college age, Thackeray attended Trinity College, Cambridge, but he left before completing his degree. Instead, he devoted his time to traveling and journalism.

Generally considered the most effective satirist and humorist of the mid-nineteenth century, Thackeray moved from humorous journalism to successful fiction with a facility that was partially the result of a genial fictional persona and a graceful, relaxed style. At his best, he held up a mirror to Victorian manners and morals, gently satirizing, with a tone of sophisticated acceptance, the inevitable failure of the individual and of society. He took up the popular fictional situation of the young person of talent who must make his way in the world and dramatized it with satiric directness in The Luck of Barry Lyndon (1844), with the highest fictional skill and appreciation of complexities inherent within the satiric vision in his masterpiece, Vanity Fair (1847), and with a great subtlety of point of view and background in his one historical novel, Henry Esmond (1852). Vanity Fair, a complex interweaving in a vast historical panorama of a large number of characters, derives its title from John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress and attempts to invert for satirical purposes, the traditional Christian image of the City of God. Vanity Fair, the corrupt City of Man, remains Thackeray's most appreciated and widely read novel. It contrasts the lives of two boarding-school friends, Becky Sharp and Amelia Smedley.

Constantly attuned to the demands of incidental journalism and his sense of professionalism in his relationship with his public, Thackeray wrote entertaining sketches and children's stories and published his humorous lectures on eighteenth-century life and literature. His own fiction shows



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